Coolikan Podcast #2: Intimate Partner Violence, the NFL and the Church

In February, Baltimore Raven’s star running back Ray Rice punched his then fiancé, Janay,  in an Atlantic City hotel elevator knocking her unconscious.  Seven months later on September 8th, after TMZ released footage of the attack in the elevator,  the Baltimore Ravens terminated Rice’s contract (source). This is not the first incident of domestic violence in the NFL or any other sports league.

“From 1989 to 1994 alone, 140 current and former professional or college football players were reported to police for violent acts against women, the Washington Postreported in 1994.” (source)

In fact, the following is a link to an article, which breaks down the rate and history of NFL arrests (by type) since 2000 – NFL Arrest Rates: LINK

On this post, we  discuss Ray Rice’s suspension, the NFL culture and intimate partner violence.

*Honorable Mentions*

Prince Ea: “How never to FAIL at anything EVER again”: LINK

Prince Ea: “Why I think this world should end”: LINK 

20 Standout Groups Stopping Domestic Violence: LINK

“Justice will not be served until those who are unaffected are as outraged as those who are.” – Benjamin Franklin

Clutch Magazine Article on Womanism: LINK 

*editors note (correction): Ray Rice said alcohol triggered his reaction and he turns into a different person.  But he didn’t say he was an alcoholic

Coolikan Podcast #1 – Racial Healing, Reconciliation and the Church

#TeamCoolikan

On August 7th, Coolikan member Acasia Olson boarded a train and set out on her 10-day cross-country campaign to promote racial healing and reconciliation in the U.S.  During her time on board, the nation experienced a flare up in race relations as Michael Brown, a young unnarmed African American male, was shot by a cop in Ferguson Missouri.  Acasia continued hosting conversations on race and racial healing with people across the nation in hopes of learning what we as a nation can do to heal and dismantle racism.

On this episode, we talk about race, reconciliation, the Church and the need for this nation to heal.  

The honest intersection of confronting an unjust society as a disciple of a loving and radical God:

“God, I don’t want to believe that you died for all these people who [stole, lynched, lied, shot and oppressed].  Just like you died for me you died for them, and I am struggle to accept the fact that you did…How do I learn to see them with the heart and love you have, because you died for them like you died for me…”

Honorable Mentions:

Pastor Matt Chandler Speaks Up White Privilege  – Article here